Sunday, July 8, 2012

Survived My Honeymoon...

Well I am back in Pennsylvania as of suppertime last night. After a glorious week off in south western Virginia, it is nice to be back home. My cats are happy to see us and the house totaly needs cleaning but that is typical. We saw some lovely places, visited friends in the area, ate some wonderful southern cooking. I can see why they made the state tourism slogan, Virginia is for lovers. We know we will be back to visit in the future.

I have made some progress on the cleaning on the short-time that I have been home, put away my french hood rack in the closet with my other hats. They need to be protected from the cats, though they have the sense to leave them alone. Found some old pants of Justin's and going to drop them off at the office after work, they no longer fit him. Also cleaned out the cardboad boxes in the living and sewing room, they are going in the shed. I have to hang up some of my costumes on hangers but that won't take long. I wish I didn't have to work this morning, otherwise the cleaning would be all done by the time we would be gaming in the afternoon. Oh well should have requested one more day I guess.

After getting about half the laundry done from vacation, and dealing with a power outage when we got home. I have to say my week was pretty productive. While I was away, I found 100% wool crewel thread at a small shop in Abingdon Va, called Plumb Alley Stitchery. The wool thread is something the owner told me she doesn't normally carry. I would buy the rest off of her if it wasn't all white, a color I don't use much. Though I now have some authentic crewel wool, so very pleased and bought it for a steal. As usual the brick and mortar bookstores don't carry my type of books even if they are not in my area. I was able to find a new crewel embroidery book online and got a discount with my ebay bucks. Very much worth it and bought some silk embroidery floss on ebay too, so very much ready to do some awesome historical embroidery.

Speaking of projects, I am done with my left hand Elizabethan Glove, just have to sew up the lining and good to go. Finished the embroidery, sewed it to the leather glove, and sewed up most of the lining on the inside of the cuff. Will post picture of the pair soon.  On the other projects front, I did finish two Tudor Gowns before I left for honeymoon and do need to get photos of them and one that I have not gotten photos done with yet. So lot of pictures are soon coming, will have to post another garb gallery. I am thinking these may have to be done on my day off, may not have much time otherwise.

Well  I am working on some garb plans, something to use my new crewel wool on. Oh my going to be good, though will take a while to complete. Doing to do some research now and will get back to everyone with plans.

Concocting Something Good,

Maureen

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Peacock

Peacock

Tudor Q and A

What is a Tudorosity?

A mashed combination of the words Tudor and Curiosity to create the word Tudorosity. Tudorosities is the plural form and the deffinition is as follows.

Tudorosity- an desire to learn or know anything about the Tudor dynasty assocated with years 1405 through 1603.

Most people ask my why I make the Tudor garb ?

I find the clothing of this era not only beautiful but also challenging to sew. There is much more care and purpose put into making garments and wearing garments in the Tudor Era. I love the look of Tudor so much I wanted to explore the way clothes were made back then and the subtle changes in fashion and styles of time.

How did you get started in this interesting hobby?

I started with art first, I love to draw, paint, and sculpt all the traditional fine arts. So being able to draw helps me visualize the looks I want to create in my garb. History has always been a huge interest of mine and I've had a knack for sewing since I was 6 years old. It all started with doll clothes and I learned cross stitch embroidery from my grandmother when I was little. I am self taught sewer, crochet, knitting, embroidery and tatting. My methods are learned from books mainly and there is still so much more to learn.

What is my favorite outfit and why?

It would be like picking a favorite out of one of my future children, its impossible. I love all my gown creations and really like the distinct differences in all the styles clothing I make for the Tudor Era.

Do you make the whole outfit including hat, shoes, and undergarments?

I do have a goal of making a complete Tudor from the skin out. As of right now I make 80% of my gowns and accessories. The shoes, corset, stockings, and petticoats are bought online and the petticoats are a close reproduction but not made by me. Though someday I plan on making a reed corset and petticoat to wear under my gowns, as well as other accessories.

How long does it take to make a gown?

It all depends on the type of gown I plan on making and the time period and class of the design. Generally if I work on it 8 hours a day on a sewing machine it will take 3 days to get the basics and another 5 days to do finish hand-sewing details and beading. So a week to a week and a half if working on it steady for that amount of time. I work a full-time job so it does take longer than a week to complete. I put over 40-100 hours per outfit depending on its complexity, its like its own full time job of sorts.

Do you make renaissance clothing for sale or custom orders?

No, due to new employment and changes in my lifestyle. Unfortunately, I have no time to support sewing for others. Though I recommend sewing lessons for those adventurous few. There are many fine folks who make and sell historical clothing. I suggest guidance with sew from many fine historical enthusiastic costumers out on the internet.

How long have you been making these elaborate costumes?

I have been in the Society of Creative Anachronism coming up on my 10th year. Active since 2004 working at demonstrations and volunteering when I could between working and other life's distractions. I really concentrated on Tudor sewing in 2007 and worked with patterns to learn proper fabrics, techniques, fit, and silhouette. I really enjoy the eras transition from a medieval form fitting layered cotterdie to the boned Tudor kirtle and then to structured Elizabethan clothing.

Tudor Rose

Tudor Rose

Lady Willoughby

Lady Willoughby

Tudor Rose

Tudor Rose

Peach Elizabethan Noble

Peach Elizabethan Noble

Tudor Rose

Tudor Rose

Mauve Waistcoat Elizabethan Gown

Mauve Waistcoat Elizabethan Gown

Tudor Rose

Tudor Rose

O'Cadhla Heraldry

O'Cadhla Heraldry

Queen Mary I of England

Queen Mary I of England